Wednesday, 25 August 2010

The Great Migration


Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya
All the dark dots in the background are wildebeest
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The largest mass movent of land mammals on the planet, the Great Migration envolves millions of ungulates, most notably wildebeest, as they follow an annual circular route around the Serengeti Ecosystem in an endless quest for fresh pastures and water.

 

10 comments:

Dave-CostaRicaDailyPhoto.com said...

We saw this migration in February in the Serengeti in Tanzania. It was amazing. the Wildebeast were dots on the landscape and horizon as far as the eye could see. Their newborn babies can walk and run within minutes of birth, which they needed to do to keep up with the migraiton and avoid the circling hyenas.

Food, Fun and Life in the Charente said...

The wildebeest migration is amazing. Something I have never seen. I have travelled from Algiers to Capetown but have never been to Kenya or Tanzania.

I love the first picture of the zebras. Diane

Joan Elizabeth said...

You've seen this! How fortunate you are.

Costea Andrea Mihai said...

superb! national geographic images!

Francisca said...

These are breathtaking images, JM. Like paintings. But I bet still nothing compared to actually being there and just looking... in awe.

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

The one and only time I went up there for the migration I had to turn around and come back due to car problems (a new vehicle too) and have never been back up. Got to go sometime soon!!

Serline said...

And they have been doing this for years and years... let's hope we do not do anything to put these majestic creatures and their ways of life in jeopardy.

Joop Zand said...

FANTASTIC PICTURES.....I like this so much.

greetings, Joop

michael said...

That's a lot of animals. I've only seen caribou migrating so this is a treat.

tapirgal said...

You can't beat zebras for graphically beautiful animal photos. This one really captivated me. The wildebeest and their migrations are fascinating, but I can't escape those black and white form-fitting stripes.